By John King with Matt Friend 

Would you heat up and eat a lasagna freezer-dinner if it was baked, packaged, and sold by a toothpaste company (Colgate)?

What about green ketchup… would you smother your French fries or hotdog with something that tasted like regular ketchup, but looked like something harvested from your sinuses? Were you among the misfortunate souls tricked into trying New! Coke in the 1980s? What about Jello salad… actual lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes and cheese encased in colorful gelatin?

These rank among history’s worst innovations.

Why does innovation scare us? Why are we sometimes tempted to fear change in any aspect of life or society?

Here are three reasons why…

#1 We fear risk.

Every innovation in history required risk.

The world would never have known the printing press without risk. How could our ancestors have known for sure that paper currency would be so successful, that steel would be so useful, that electric lights would change the sleeping habits of billions, or that the steam engine would be the first domino in a long journey to space flight?

However, the road to success is strewn with the carnage of  failure. For every profitable innovation-story, the library of history records a myriad stories that didn’t work.

And those stories haunt us.

#2 We fear discomfort.

How did you feel last week when you woke up and checked your Facebook profile, only to find that Mark Zuckerberg and his compadres changed the look of your app, again? Didn’t they just update it two weeks ago? And a month ago? And…

Most of us are hardwired to crave peace, calm, order, and comfort. The new methods, ideas, or products hitched to the wagon of innovation sometimes scare us to death.

#3 We’re suspicious that there’s a hidden motive behind the change.

Is someone trying to take advantage of me? How much will I lose if I buy in? If it’s not broken, why try to fix it? When will the other shoe drop?

Trying to make sense of it all

It’s true. Not all innovations are helpful. The wise man and women keeps a weather-eye on the horizon and seeks to discern the immediate and long-term profitability of each change.

However, the people in our church have come to believe…

Change, creativity, and innovation are not things to be feared, but instead, are things to be rooted in and used for the glory of God.

Change, creativity, and innovation are not things to be feared, but instead, are things to be rooted in and used for the glory of God. Click To Tweet

While God’s character never changes, He is the author of incalculable change. The entire narrative of the Bible is about change.

While God’s character never changes, He is the author of incalculable change. The entire narrative of the Bible is about change. Click To Tweet

The greatest innovation in history occurred when God robed Himself in human DNA, was born on Christmas morning, lived perfectly among us, sacrificed Himself for us, and arose from the grave three days later…

The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth (John 1:14).

When my friends and I began trusting in Jesus, the Pioneer of all change, our fears began to subside knowing that He loves us, is in charge of all things, and is faithful to care for His own.

Whether that’s your conclusion or not, maybe the best thing you can do now is begin trusting Jesus–not the “predictability” of culture–who can bring peace and calm to your life like no one else.

John King serves as the Executive Pastor at Bible Center Church. He grew up in West Virginia and has been a part-time New River whitewater rafting guide for over 20 years. He and his wife, Emily, are raising three daughters: Allison, Alana, and Abigail.